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World History Modern Unit 9 Curriculum Outline

Disclaimer: This outline is sourced directly from the APWHM Course Framework released by the College Board. This is a lightweight, web-friendly format for easy reference. Omninox does not take credit for this outline and is not affiliated with the College Board. AP is a reserved trademark of the College Board.

Table of Contents

Unit 1
Unit 2
Unit 3
Unit 4
Unit 5
Unit 6
Unit 7
Unit 8
Unit 9 (you are here)

TOPIC 9.1 - Advances in Technology and Exchange After 1900

U9_Learning Objective A: Explain how the development of new technologies changed the world from 1900 to present.

  • KC-6.1.I.A: New modes of communication—including radio communication, cellular communication, and the internet—as well as transportation, including air travel and shipping containers, reduced the problem of geographic distance.
  • KC-6.1.I.D: Energy technologies, including the use of petroleum and nuclear power, raised productivity and increased the production of material goods.
  • KC-6.1.III.B: More effective forms of birth control gave women greater control over fertility, transformed reproductive practices, and contributed to declining rates of fertility in much of the world.
  • KC-6.1.I.B: The Green Revolution and commercial agriculture increased productivity and sustained the earth's growing population as it spread chemically and genetically modified forms of agriculture.
  • KC-6.1.I.C: Medical innovations, including vaccines and antibiotics, increased the ability of humans to survive and live longer lives.

TOPIC 9.2 - Technological Advances and Limitations After 1900: Disease

U9_Learning Objective B: Explain how environmental factors affected human populations over time.

  • KC-6.1.III: Diseases, as well as medical and scientific developments, had significant effects on populations around the world.
  • KC-6.1.III.A: Diseases associated with poverty persisted while other diseases emerged as new epidemics and threats to human populations, in some cases leading to social disruption. These outbreaks spurred technological and medical advances. Some diseases occurred at higher incidence merely because of increased longevity.

TOPIC 9.3 - Technological Advances: Debates About the Environment After 1900

U9_Learning Objective C: Explain the causes and effects of environmental changes in the period from 1900 to present.

  • KC-6.1.II.A: As human activity contributed to deforestation, desertification, a decline in air quality, and increased consumption of the world's supply of fresh water, humans competed over these and other resources more intensely than ever before.
  • KC-6.1.II.B: The release of greenhouse gases and pollutants into the atmosphere contributed to debates about the nature and causes of climate change.

TOPIC 9.4 - Economics in the Global Age

U9_Learning Objective D: Explain the continuities and changes in the global economy from 1900 to present.

  • KC-6.3.I.D: In a trend accelerated by the end of the Cold War, many governments encouraged free-market economic policies and promoted economic liberalization in the late 20th century.
  • KC-6.3.I.E: In the late 20th century, revolutions in information and communications technology led to the growth of knowledge economies in some regions, while industrial production and manufacturing were increasingly situated in Asia and Latin America.
  • KC-6.3.II.B: Changing economic institutions, multinational corporations, and regional trade agreements reflected the spread of principles and practices associated with free-market economics throughout the world.

TOPIC 9.5 - Calls for Reform and Responses After 1900

U9_Learning Objective E: Explain how social categories, roles, and practices have been maintained and changed over time.

  • KC-6.3.III.i: Rights-based discourses challenged old assumptions about race, class, gender, and religion.
  • KC-6.3.III.ii: In much of the world, access to education as well as participation in new political and professional roles became more inclusive in terms of race, class, gender, and religion.
  • KC-6.3.II.C: Movements throughout the world protested the inequality of the environmental and economic consequences of global integration.

TOPIC 9.6 - Globalized Culture After 1900

U9_Learning Objective F: Explain how and why globalization changed culture over time.

  • KC-6.3.IV.i: Political and social changes of the 20th century led to changes in the arts and in the second half of the century, popular and consumer culture became more global.
  • KC-6.3.IV.ii: Arts, entertainment, and popular culture increasingly reflected the influence of a globalized society.
  • KC-6.3.IV.iii: Consumer culture became globalized and transcended national borders.

TOPIC 9.7 - Resistance to Globalization After 1900

U9_Learning Objective G: Explain the various responses to increasing globalization from 1900 to present.

  • KC-6.3.IV.iv: Responses to rising cultural and economic globalization took a variety of forms.

TOPIC 9.8 - Institutions Developing in a Globalized World

U9_Learning Objective H: Explain how and why globalization changed international interactions among states.

  • KC-6.3.II.A: New international organizations, including the United Nations, formed with the stated goal of maintaining world peace and facilitating international cooperation.

TOPIC 9.9 - Continuity and Change in a Globalized World

U9_Learning Objective I: Explain the extent to which science and technology brought change in the period from 1900 to the present.

  • KC-6.1: Rapid advances in science and technology altered the understanding of the universe and the natural world and led to advances in communication, transportation, industry, agriculture, and medicine.
    • KC-6.1.I.A: New modes of communication - including radio communication, cellular communication, and the internet - as well as transportation, including air travel and shipping containers, reduced the problem of geographic distance.
    • KC-6.1.I.D: Energy technologies, including the use of petroleum and nuclear power, raised productivity and increased the production of material goods.
    • KC-6.1.III.B: More effective forms of birth control gave women greater control over fertility, transformed reproductive practices, and contributed to declining rates of fertility in much of the world.
    • KC-6.1.I.B: The Green Revolution and commercial agriculture increased productivity and sustained the earth's growing population as it spread chemically and genetically modified forms of agruiculture.
    • KC-6.1.I.C: Medical innovations, including vaccines and antibiotics, increased the ability of humans to survive and live longer lives.
  • KC-6.3.I: States responded in a variety of ways to the economic challenges of the 20th century.
  • KC-6.3.III.i: Rights-based discourses challenged old assumptions about race, class, gender, and religion.
  • KC-6.3.III.ii: In much of the world, access to education as well as participation in new political and professional roles became more inclusive in terms of race, class, gender, and religion.
  • KC-6.3.IV.i: Political and social changes of the 20th century led to changes in the arts and in the second half of the century, popular and consumer culture became more global.
  • KC-6.3.IV.ii: Arts, entertainment, and popular culture increasingly reflected the influence of a globalized society.
  • KC-6.3.IV.iii: Consumer culture became globalized and transcended national borders.