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World History Modern Unit 1 Curriculum Outline

Disclaimer: This outline is sourced directly from the APWHM Course Framework released by the College Board. This is a lightweight, web-friendly format for easy reference. Omninox does not take credit for this outline and is not affiliated with the College Board. AP is a reserved trademark of the College Board.

Table of Contents

Unit 1 (you are here)
Unit 2
Unit 3
Unit 4
Unit 5
Unit 6
Unit 7
Unit 8
Unit 9

TOPIC 1.1 - Developments in East Asia from c. 1200 to c. 1450

U1 _Learning Objective A: Explain the systems of government employed by Chinese dynasties and how they developed over time.

  • KC-3.2.I.A: Empires and states in Afro-Eurasia and the Americas demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity in the 13th centure. This included the Song Dynasty of China, which utlized traditional methods of Confucianism and an imperial bureaucracy to maintain and justify its rule.

U1_Learning Objective B: Explain the effects of Chinese cultural traditions on East Asia over time.

KC-3.1.III.D.i: Chinese cultural traditions continued, and they influenced neighboring regions.

KC-3.1.III.D.ii: Buddhism and its core beliefs continued to shape societies in Asia and included a variety of branches, schools, and practices.

U1_Learning Objective C: Explain the effects of innovation on the Chinese economy over time.

KC-3.3.III.A.i: The economy of Song China became increasingly commercialized while continuing to depend on free peasant and artisanal labor.

KC-3.1.I.D: The economy of Song China flourished as a result of increased productive capacity, expanding trade networks, and innovations in agriculture and manufacturing.

TOPIC 1.2 - Developments in Dar al-Islam from c. 1200 to c. 1450

U1_Learning Objective D: Explain how systems of belief and their practices affected society in the period from c. 1200 to c. 1450.

  • KC-3.1.III.D.iii: Islam, Judaism, Christianity, and the core beliefs and practices of these religions continued to shape societies in Africa and Asia.

U1_Learning Objective E: Explain the causes and effects of the rise of Islamic states over time.

  • KC-3.2.I: As the Abbasid Caliphate fragmented, new Islamic political entities emerged, most of which were dominated by Turkic peoples. These states demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity.

  • KC-3.1.III.A: Muslim rule continued to expand to many parts of Afro-Eurasia due to military expansion, and Islam subsequently expanded through the activities of merchants, missionaries, and Sufis.

U1_Learning Objective F: Explain the effects of intellectual innovation in Dar al-Islam.

  • KC-3.2.II.A.i: Muslim states and empires encouraged significant intellectual innovations and transfers.

TOPIC 1.3 - Developments in South and Southeast Asia from c. 1200 to c. 1450

U1_Learning Objective G: Explain how the various belief systems and practices of South and Southeast Asia affected society over time.

  • KC-3.1.III.D.iv: Hinduism, Islam, and Buddhism, and their core beliefs and practices, continued to shape societies in South and Southeast Asia.

U1_Learning Objective H: Explain how and why various states of South and Southeast Asia development and maintained power over time.

  • KC-3.2.I.B.i: State formation and development demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity, including the new Hindu and Buddhist states that emerged in South and Southeast Asia.

TOPIC 1.4 - State Building in the Americas

U1_Learning Objective I: Explain how and why states in the Americas developed and changed over time.

  • KC-3.2.I.D.i: In the Americas, as in Afro-Eurasia, state systems demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity, and expanded in scope and reach.

TOPIC 1.5 - State Building in Africa

U1_Learning Objective J: Explain how and why states in Africa developed and changed over time.

  • KC-3.2.I.D.ii: In Africa, as in Eurasia and the Americas, state systems demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity and expanded in scope and reach.

TOPIC 1.6 - Developments in Europe from c. 1200 to c. 1450

U1_Learning Objective K: Explain how the beliefs and practices of the predominant religions in Europe affected European society.

  • KC-3.1.III.D.v: Christianity, Judaism, Islam, and the core beliefs and practices of these religions continue to shape societies in Europe.

U1_Learning Objective L: Explain the causes and consequences of political decentralization in Europe from c. 1200 to c. 1450.

  • KC-3.2.I.B.ii: Europe was politically fragmented and characterized by decentralized monarchies, feudalism, and the manorial system.

U1_Learning Objective M: Explain the effects of agriculture on social organization in Europe from c. 1200 to C. 1450.

  • KC-3.3.III.C: Europe was largely an agricultural society dependent on free and coerced labor, including serfdom.

TOPIC 1.7 - Comparison in the Period from c. 1200 to c. 1450

U1_Learning Objective N: Explain the similarities and differences in the processes of state formation from c. 1200 to c. 1450.

  • KC-3.2: State formation and development demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity in various regions.
    • KC-3.2.I: As the Abbasid Caliphate fragmented, new Islamic political entities emerged, most of which were dominated by Turkic peoples. These states demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity.
    • KC-3.2.I.A: Empires and states in Afro-Eurasia and the Americas demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity in the 13th century. This included the Song Dynasty of China, which utlized traditional methods of Confucianism and an imperial bureaucracy to maintain and justify its rule.
    • KC-3.2.I.B.i: State formation and development demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity, including the new Hindu and Buddhist states that emerged in South and Southeast Asia.
    • KC-3.2.I.D.i: In the Americas, as in Afro-Eurasia, state systems demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity, and expanded in scope and reach.
    • KC-3.2.I.D.ii: In africa, as in Eurasia and the Americas, state systems demonstrated continuity, innovation, and diversity, and expanded in scope and reach.